2011-04-12 / Front Page

Restoration Project Nearly Complete On 140-Year-Old Cunot Community Chapel

Restoring Old Church A Reminder Of Losses Along State Road 42
by Michael Stanley Staff Writer


Cunot contractor Robert Langdon of Fair & Square Construction, with volunteer help from friends Troy Martin and Spencer Hardware worker Andy Standeford in the boom truck, provided their services Friday morning to re-set a reconditioned bell tower on the 140-year-old Cunot Community Chapel. (Staff Photo) Cunot contractor Robert Langdon of Fair & Square Construction, with volunteer help from friends Troy Martin and Spencer Hardware worker Andy Standeford in the boom truck, provided their services Friday morning to re-set a reconditioned bell tower on the 140-year-old Cunot Community Chapel. (Staff Photo) When Cunot’s Robert Langdon picked up a copy of The Hoosier Topics in early October, he read a sobering story of one friend’s efforts to memorialize a lost buddy, and Langdon wanted to be involved.

This past Friday morning saw the most significant exterior aspect of the house of worship be re-set to its rightful place atop the 140-year-old Cunot Community Chapel in the form of a refinished bell tower.

The project began when Cunot resident Mike Meyers and co-workers from Walmart Distribution in Greencastle set out to remodel the church built in 1871 in memory of the late Jamie Spears of Cunot.


Fair & Square Construction owner Robert Langdon (left), along with friend and co-worker Troy Martin, work to replace the bell tower on top of the old Cunot Community Chapel. (Staff Photo) Fair & Square Construction owner Robert Langdon (left), along with friend and co-worker Troy Martin, work to replace the bell tower on top of the old Cunot Community Chapel. (Staff Photo) “We still have to sand the floors and do a little finish work on the inside. As far as the walls go, I didn’t want to do that until they finished the roof, but it’s getting there. We still have to do the flower beds and landscape the outside,” Meyers said. “We’ll probably put up a flag pole with a plaque dedicating it to all of the people we’ve lost. That’s what started all of this, my buddy lost his life on State Road 42 in a car accident. If you drive up and down there, you’ll see all of the crosses everywhere. We’ll make a memorial to the folks who have lost their lives on State Road 42. It’s been a good thing, the community really seems to appreciate it.”

With volunteers from around the area donating both time, efforts and materials, the deteriorating roof was one of the last aspects needing addressed.

“I was torn on what to do with the roof, I ran real low on funds, so Robert volunteered his crew, time and effort to do the roof and bell tower,” Meyers added. “I tried to hire a crane to come and take it off there to redo it, but it was going to be $1,400. Then Robert came along with enough contacts to take it down and re-do it... I couldn’t do it without people like this volunteering their time.”

Funds depleted, a community group in Cunot helped purchase metal materials for the roof and Langdon provided the labor with some help from Spencer Hardware and owner Chris Bault, who sold metal for the roof at cost and provided the services of Spencer’s Andy Standeford and a boom truck.

“I saw that Mike was doing it as a memorial. I also lost my friend in the same manner. It inspired me to give him a call and see what I could do,” Langdon explained. “He’s been working on it quite a bit; how it looked before and how it looks now is amazing, but the bell tower is the most critical part of the roof. You could have literally pushed it over. We’re going to finish today, put the pulley on and be done with it. Spencer Hardware has always been real good to me, they help me out and support me on everything. I knew they would help me out with this.”

Meyers noted that a neighboring congregation may be interested in utilizing the structure, that is, if building codes allow its use.

“They’re interested, I’m not sure about what they can do because of building codes. It doesn’t have a fire exit, sprinklers or restroom facilities,” Meyers said. “But I’m hoping they can use it and people can rent it out for weddings or family gettogethers. I feel good about it, it’s coming right along.”

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