2013-01-15 / Front Page

Putnam County Couple Honored As IASWCD ‘Individual Friend Of Conservation’ For 2012


The IASWCD’s 2012 Friend of Conservation award winners in the individual category are Allen and Peggy Royer from Putnam County, shown with their son, Bradley (second from right) and award sponsor Megan Grebner, Brownfield Ag News (far right). 
(Courtesy Photo) The IASWCD’s 2012 Friend of Conservation award winners in the individual category are Allen and Peggy Royer from Putnam County, shown with their son, Bradley (second from right) and award sponsor Megan Grebner, Brownfield Ag News (far right). (Courtesy Photo) The Indiana Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts (IASWCD) held its annual Conservation Awards Banquet on January 8th as part of the organization’s 70th Annual Conference of Indiana Soil and Water Conservation Districts (SWCDs). The theme for the conference was “The Power of Conservation: Today’s Actions, Tomorrow’s Rewards.”

Among the six major awards presented, the Friend of Conservation Award was presented in three categories: corporate, nonprofit, and individual. Award sponsor Megan Grebner, Indiana Farm Director,

Brownfield Ag News, presented plaques to the winners.

Allen and Peggy Royer of Putnam County were recognized as The Individual Friend of Conservation Award winner for 2012. The Royers have used their farm as an education site to allow over 1,000 visitors to see how conservation practices can improve soil and water quality on the farm.

The Royers work with the Indiana Department of Natural Resource’s Division of Fish and Wildlife, Law Enforcement, and Forestry, along with the Putnam County USDA Natu- ral Resources Conservation Service and Farm Service Agency, Sycamore Trails Resource Conservation & Development Council, the Putnam County Soil and Water Conservation District, and private Indiana consultant foresters to achieve their conservation goals.

During field days at the Royer farm, they show aerial photos dating back to the late 1930s, dramatically illustrating soil erosion due to deforestation and poor farming practices. This erosion was still evident in 1972. After many conservation programs were implemented, photos from 1995 show dramatic improvement in the soils and erosion control. These photos are a true selling point for all soil and water conservation programs. The Royers then take participants to the areas where the most erosion showed up in the photos and show what those areas look like today due to the implementation of conservation practices.

The three-day Annual Conference of Indiana SWCDs was held at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown in conjunction with the IASWCD’s annual Legislative Breakfast and Annual Business Meeting.

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